Music system in action

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(The Chronicle-Journal/Sandi Krasowski)

Grandview Lodge resident Colleen Kennedy is pictured in a computer as a camera tracks her movements and plays the keyboard.
(The Chronicle-Journal/Sandi Krasowski) Grandview Lodge resident Colleen Kennedy is pictured in a computer as a camera tracks her movements and plays the keyboard.

The Adaptive Use Musical Instrument, which was developed in New York City for children with cerebral palsy, is a program to help integrate them into the world of music in a way that was physically possible. The system involves a computer where the onboard camera tracks the movement of the user and triggers sound samples to make music. Research partners across North America, including Thunder Bay, developed the system as part of a larger research project called Improvisation, Community and Social Practice. The first performance of the program at Grandview Lodge retirement home in Thunder Bay involved seniors, and was hosted by lead researcher Gillian Siddall, dean of social science and humanities at Lakehead University, in conjunction with the Community Arts and Heritage Program and members of the Thunder Bay Symphony Orchestra. The program can be downloaded for free by visiting deeplistening.org.