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Bombardier has signed two new contracts to build 28 bilevel commuter rail cars with two U.S. West Coast transportation authorities, led by Seattle-based Sound Transit. The contracts, valued at US$108 million for eight cab cars and 20 coaches, will provide work for the Thunder Bay Bombardier …

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At this time of year, Gammondale Farm is usually bustling with

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More than 150 Canadian Rangers have volunteered to go on full-time

When a customer took a moment to thank a front-line worker for her customer care at the Dawson Road Safeway, it was a “ray of sunshine” for Barb Carr who, along with fellow staff, have dealt with the frustrations and limitations due to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

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Wilma Mol and her family operate Slate River Dairy and have family and friends in the Netherlands. They were keeping a close eye on what was happening in the Netherlands with the COVID-19 crisis, said Mol.

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The port of Thunder Bay has seen a noticeable uptick in ocean-going vessel traffic this season so far.

The Thunder Bay Country Market has been making changes to the way they do business as people self-isolate to stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

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Superior North EMS received a donation of face masks to keep paramedics safe on the front lines.

Barrick Gold Corp. says it’s feeling optimistic about the company’s 2020 production targets, even though the economy as a whole seems gloomy due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

All businesses are reeling from the COVID-19 crisis, with personal services workers in the hair care industry being particularly hard hit.

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A Thunder Bay clothing company is mass-producing cloth face masks in an effort to help the community get through the COVID-19 crisis.

Two weeks ago, Jamie Nicols figured he was out of business due to the emergency measures in place to stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Northerners fork out more than their southern Ontario counterparts for basic staples like groceries and gasoline, but cheaper costs for housing and items like recreational fees make life more affordable overall, says a recent economic study.

Retirements, an aging population and a continuing trend toward out-migration will create numerous job openings in the Thunder Bay district across a wide variety of employment sectors, researchers who study labour market trends say.

Harte Gold has temporarily suspended operations at its Sugar Zone mine near White River to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus, but company employees are to be kept being paid at least through April.

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Workers at Resolute Forest Products are working to capacity to keep up with the production of pulp needed for the manufacturing of personal protective equipment for health-care workers.

After careful consideration of the possible community impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic and the corresponding need for people to take necessary precautions, the City of Dryden council has declared a state of emergency for Dryden.

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The international pulp market is hot right now, says Thunder Bay-Rainy River MP and physician Marcus Powlowski, and there is very good reason for this.

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In the last three weeks, Pamela Lapierre figures she has made about 50 litres of hand sanitizer in her shop in Kakabeka Falls.

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This year’s shipping season opened on Thursday with the arrival of a tug and barge, a first for Thunder Bay’s port.

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In all her years teaching people the correct way to operate a car, Thunder Bay driving instructor Jennifer Berlinquette-Chabluk can’t remember the price of gasoline ever dipping under a buck

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A transitional housing project for Indigenous youths will proceed after an appeal was dismissed by the Ontario Municipal Board’s local planning appeal tribunal.

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The Thunder Bay Country Market was a welcome bit of normalcy on Wednesday as the city ground to a halt to help in the fight against the global COVID-19 pandemic.

The Ministry of Labour says it won’t require underground miners to wear masks during the COVID-19 virus outbreak, but restrictions on the maximum number of workers who can be inside elevator cages remain in place.

Union officials didn’t have many answers concerning the future of Thunder Bay’s Bombardier plant on Tuesday after it was announced the company would be stopping production on all its aircraft and rail production because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The latest restrictions to limit the spread of COVID-19 in Ontario will not interfere with news sources, including The Chronicle-Journal, as they update the public on how communities are coping with the deadly coronavirus.

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While about half the businesses in the Municipality of Oliver Paipoonge have closed because of COVID-19 prevention measures, at least two are seeing an increase in traffic in the village of Kakabeka Falls.

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Ollie Pedersen said she was shocked to find empty shelves throughout Thunder Bay during her regular weekly grocery trip.

Before provincial labour officials embark on a grand plan for a “road-map” to help workers end up in “good, high-quality jobs,” they might want to take a drive to Terrace Bay — where jobs are plentiful, but workers are not.

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The business disruptors took over Ingenuity at Lakehead University this past weekend.

The Lakehead Thunderwolves will take their modest two-game winning streak on the road tonight in Waterloo.

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With a hockey tournament at Fort William First Nation over the weekend, local business owners agree it is difficult to say yet whether the re-opening of the James Street Swing bridge will bring more customers, but it did get put through its paces.

Two contrasting Thunder Bay businesses have found a recipe that resonates with the public: pastries and desserts served with a smile, and providing a service to address mental health issues.

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Local restaurants are seeing more American credits cards this year said Paul Pepe the city’s manager of tourism.

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Indigenous business owners in Northern Ontario now have some support and advocating power behind them with the start of the Anishnawbe Business Professional Association on Friday.

Thunder Bay’s Zen Graphene Solutions has retained a Toronto-based communications consultant to promote the company’s ongoing efforts to develop a high-purity graphite deposit just west of Hearst.